CYCLE IN CYCLODELIC

Cyclodelic – a super stylish cycling specific clothing and accessories company – is launching their latest range at our Oxford Circus store on April 9th. Designed and handmade by cycling enthusiasts Amy Fleuriot and Sarah Buck in their East London studio, the design duo is on a mission to prove that girls don't have to reach for the unflattering fluorescent when hitting the road. Here, we chat to them about tribes of fluro yellow, puncture repair kits and antique bicycle frames.
Cyclists

What's the ethos behind Cyclodelic?
The percentage of women riders compared to male cyclists is still significantly low – we want to encourage more ladies to get in the saddle by giving them the option of fun yet functional accessories and clothing that adapt to make it easier for them to arrive by bike and still feel fabulous.

How would you define London's cycling style?
As colourful and diverse as London's people! Although many still view cyclists as tribes of flouro yellow and lycra, what you see if you look closely are all types of people riding different bicycles. The fixed gear and single speed scene has become big recently but there are so many sub genres of cyclists that covet everything from vintage frames and bmx's to thousand pound road bikes and the odd unicycle!

Who's your cycling icon?
Amy: Evelyn Hamilton is our cycling style icon from the past. In 1939 she rode 100 miles every day for 100 days, proving that women could compete with the men of her day in the sport and inspiring others after her. She also wore the most amazing clothes, knee socks, cute shorts and great jerseys that buttoned down the shoulder. We've taken a lot of inspiration from Evelyn for our forthcoming clothing collection.

What’s your favourite cycling ensemble?
Amy: The past few weeks of warmer weather have been great as I've been able to wear our new kaleidescope print bamboo t-shirts which I team with my favourite bright green jeans, a gold ankle cuff from our accessories line and a pair of K-Swiss hi top.
Sarah: Jeans rolled up below the knee, my vintage red, green and blue Altura jersey (as I am still a messenger at heart) with one of my printed head scarves tied around my head.

If we peeked inside your cycling rucksack what would we find?
Amy: I always carry a puncture repair kit (I think it's very important to at least be able to mend your own tyre!), my fab London A to Z which is bound in gold mock snake skin (a birthday present from Sarah), my diary, a sketchbook, digital camera and a lipstick.
Sarah: As a former cycle messenger I prefer a messenger bag rather then a rucksack. At the moment I keep it quite light as I'm 7 months pregnant. I'm winging it by not carrying a tool bag or pump!

What cycling trend of the past would you like to come back?
Sarah: When we were researching for the new collection we came across a publication from the 1800's called the "Lady Cyclist" and fell in love with antique bicycle frames. I recently bought a bicycle frame made in the 50s or 60s which I had re-sprayed – the frame builder is no longer in business but was a popular choice once and any existing frames seem to be sought after. It ending up costing me triple the price of my modern bicycle though!

What's your favourite cycling route?
Amy: I really enjoy cycling from East to West along the north side of the Embankment. The road is fast and clear so you can really get some speed up whilst taking in the sites from London Bridge to the Houses of Parliment and Big Ben.
Sarah: Cylcing from my house in Camberwell to Crystal Palace, passing through leafy Herne Hill, Dulwich Village, Dulwich College and then past the Crystal Palace Park. There is a Cafe next to the park where you can have a coffee before starting a long ride through the North Downs